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How I DRIVE Deals - Part I

Sales Representatives

Identifying a sales process for a new business can be difficult. We are a perfect example of how matching your sales process with your customer’s buying habits is extremely important. As we’ve evolved our process and matched it with our customer’s habits, it’s become evident that gaining buy-in from all stakeholders is the most painful part. We came to a realization that getting buy-in from an entire team meant a few things, and one of those things was that we needed to be more transparent with our sales process. Who knew transparency can set expectations without causing an awkward moment?

It’s now second nature for me to say, “The next step in our sales process is an all sponsor demo, where we ask that all stakeholders be present.” I can repeat this throughout the initial demo and let it sink in with our sponsor. This is important because we have to empower our sponsor to take the next step. In our case, this step means literally pulling up your boss’s calendar and scheduling another meeting.

We know they have access to their boss’s calendar so if they tell us, “no, I don’t have access to the calendar” then there may be an additional objection that we need to handle before our initial sponsor is willing to move forward. However, identifying the yes’s and no’s as early in the sales cycle as possible helps save everyone’s time.

Nobody wants to be chased down with emails and phone calls, and we don’t want to chase anyone down either. Part of the process is always understanding that if this deal isn’t a good fit then let’s be open about it.

We stole the upfront contract from Sandler, we break up early in the conversation so you don’t have to. We also took a metric ton of information out of The Challenger Sale. In our industry, we can’t sell clicks. We can’t sell features of a product either. It’s all about the end result. Prospects need to know “WHAT DOES THIS DO FOR ME?! WHAT’S THE R.O.I?!”

Einstein Meme

In our case efficiency is one of the most evident cases to purchase our software and we hear this objection quite often, “I don’t have time to see a demo.” Our response is simple and true, “What if I could save you 3 hours a week, is that worth 30 minutes of your time?”

I digress, back to The Challenger Sale. Matthew Dixon and Brent Adamson, authors of The Challenger Sale, really drive home the point that to be a challenger you must be a teacher. You must challenge your client and let them tell you why they don’t want your product instead of begging them to buy it because of features and benefits.

TopOPPS utilizes this idea in our sales process stage called, “Compelling Need”. As a salesperson we need to understand not only what the surface pain is but also HOW does that affect their business? I mean sure, you missed your forecast, thats awful, but how does that affect your business? If we can understand the true underlying need, then we can establish value and a timeline.

In closure for part 1. I think it’s important to note that mixing sales methods to match your process and customer buying habits is important. Identifying key buying habits and the rest of the DRIVE sales process will be included in part 2.

So we’ve got this far. We understand what your pain points are and why they’re important to your company. We understand your initiatives and timeline for this purchase. So now, how do we get to closure? What decision makers have been involved? And has anyone given us verbal commitment? Do we understand how XYZ company makes their decisions?

TopOPPS