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The Warrior

Cold calling, lead hunting and everything else that goes into sales development should be easy, right?

...

Not a chance.

What is that little voice saying inside of your sales development representative’s (SDR) head as he gets a hot prospect on the phone today?

A. Let's Go! -- or -- B. Oh shit!

How many times a day does an SDR get on the phone with their dream prospect, or any prospect for that matter, and they just...miss?

So often SDRs are dialling, hoping that their call goes through to voicemail, petrified to speak with a live person. If this is how your team feels, if there is even a thought of timidness, FIRE THEM!!! Just kidding. Kind of. Give them some constructive reframing.

So, those of you who want to train a team of SDR Badasses, listen up:

Please, for the love of all things good and true, DO NOT slip into some romanticized idea that the unprepared SDR on your team will be able to win over decision makers just like David slayed Goliath on the field of battle. You’re forgetting that David killed lions and bears on a regular basis way before he took on Goliath. After all, someone had to teach David how to be a crazy badass. Check out VorsightBP’s Guide to Cold Calling

Everyone is an up-and-coming SDR Badass wannabe:

We live in a world that is all about instant gratification: getting what you want, when you want it, and with minimal work. Of course anyone should know that getting exactly what you want exactly when you want it is a lie. Quite frankly, it’s a recipe for disaster. So turn in your team’s dreams of becoming a Millennial Sales Superstar by waking them up and training.

Getting people to open an email or pick up the phone is the easy part. After all, there are apps for that (Connect & Sell, SalesLoft). It’s what takes place once you have piqued someone’s interest that makes a true salesman. Make sure your team is well versed on everything from the ins and outs of your product to basic customer service courtesies.

Know your shit!

You have to know your pitch so well that you can have a convincing conversation about your solution in your sleep. Moreover, the better you know it, the better your team will. So map it out! Everyone should know what their prospects’ answers will be. As of yesterday, have a list of all objections and your AIOA (Agree Isolate Overcome Ask) response. This way when you get on the phone you’re not only prepared for battle, you’re ready to win the war. If it’s clear though that it’s not a fit for either party, don’t be afraid to take the high road and walk away.

Practice being predictably wild:

In our office, if there is one thing that everyone can count on, it is that the SDR team will be the loudest, most crazy, tenacious team players. Celebrating by riding the pony, chariot races, breakdancing and more spontaneously combust on a consistent basis when someone lands an appointment. What does that have to do with success? Everything. Positivity and excitement are contagious. From office culture to the sales person to the prospect.

Culture does not just happen; it is chosen:

If you work in a drab and dull environment chances are your sales will go the same way. Every day, over and over again, we celebrate success in whatever way it comes. Not just when we set an appointment. Sometimes success comes from learning why we lost a prospect, or why a demo was set up for someone that was not really qualified. If your team gets on the phone and is scared of failing, they will lose every time. Your team needs to get on the phone knowing from the fiber of their being that they are going to win! Whether the call goes well or not.

SDR’s have a warrior's spirit, otherwise they would not have chosen this profession. The thing is, that spirit has to be nurtured and pushed. Be willing to push yourself, and be willing to push your team.

Find out what it will take for you to start killing some lions and bears. Goliath’s number will be up soon, once he switches from a landline to a cellular device (long distance calls are really do a number on the corporate account).

Tim McMillin